SCIENCE

Could Neanderthals Make Art? | Scientific American

For centuries, the “Unicorn Cave,” or “Einhornhöhle,” in central Germany has been famous for its many thousands of bones. In…

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New Linguistics Technique Could Reveal Who Spoke the First Indo-European Languages

Almost half of all people in the world today speak an Indo-European language, one whose origins go back thousands of…

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Unprecedented Fire Season Has Raged Through One of Earth’s Biodiversity Hotspots

With ecosystems ranging from Andean highlands to vast plains to the Amazon rain forest, Colombia—perched at the juncture of Central…

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FDA Plan to Ban Hair Relaxer Chemical is Long Overdue, but Many Dangerous Ingredients Remain

In April, a dozen years after a federal agency classified formaldehyde a human carcinogen, the Food and Drug Administration is…

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Why Do Birds Have Such Skinny Legs?

February 10, 2024 4 min read The songbirds in your backyard hop around on such itty-bitty legs. Here’s why bird…

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Saturn’s ‘Death Star’ Moon May Hide a Massive, Shockingly Young Ocean

To planetary scientists, Mimas—one of Saturn’s moons—is best known for its uncanny resemblance to the Death Star in Star Wars.…

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Why Does a Solar Eclipse Move West to East?

February 3, 2024 3 min read Here’s why the path of a solar eclipse travels in the opposite direction of…

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Science Is Using Mechanical Moss to Fight Climate Change on the Canary Islands

This story was generously supported by a grant from the Pulitzer Center. TRANSCRIPT Gustavo Viera Ruiz: The foggy areas of the…

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Why Aren’t We Made of Antimatter?

The universe shouldn’t be here. Everything scientists know about particle physics, summed up in a theory called the Standard Model,…

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New ‘Chicken from Hell’ Discovered

The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation, an online publication covering the latest research. Were dinosaurs already…

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